Thursday, 22 November 2012

New EU driving licence rules

EU 3DLD - The law for under 24s regarding riding and licensing a motorcycle is due to change in January 2013

 

In January next year (which is not very far away now just the other side of Christmas and it's nearly December now!) new laws concerning driving licences come into force and are likely to impact young motorcyclists in particular, in several ways.




New EU legislation has been passed and it has been decided that due to concerns about safety and accident figures, the minimum age is going to be raised for young motorcyclists for some license categories.

Because of the variety of motorcycles out there, there are currently various different categories of licence - the first being a moped licence which you can get at 16 years old.   To graduate from this first licence to a full licence, there are two different paths you can follow which are dictated by the age of the rider.

The first method is the most straightforward - to complete the test on a large bike straightaway.  The second is to move up, gaining experience on a medium sized bike first and then on to a larger bike.  The age at which you can do these is the thing which is changing as you will now need to be older before you can start riding a larger bike.

Licence categories


A2 - This is the current category for medium sized motorcycles and the age at which you can ride one of these is 17 at the moment but will be going up in January to 19.

A - With this licence you can ride any motorcycle from the age of 21, but the age of entry will be going up to 24 from January 19th


3DLD - Third Driving Directive - Implemented from January 19th

 

Here is a run down of some of the the new licensing legislation facts:


*   Riders who want to ride any larger, category A sized bike will need to be 24 years old instead of the current 21.

 * Those taking the new A2 test, will need to do so on a bike of at least 395cc and of a certain power output. The reason for the increase is because the size of bikes that can be ridden in this category is expanding - so the test reflects this.
 
*  The A2 test age will rise from 17 to 19 and therefore the age at which the full licence can be gained will rise to 21, as you have to wait two years after passing the A2 before you can convert it into a full licence.  To convert it to a full licence you will need to take another test at this stage.

* Raising the test age means that anyone under 19 will not be able to ride any bike bigger than a 125cc



    3DLD will be introduced across Europe on Jan 19th but it will not be retrospective so if you already have a licence it will not affect you and equally if you pass your test before January 19th it will not affect you either.


    However....


    If you are in the middle of your test when the legislation comes in you may be affected as you will no longer be able to take the test for the A2 licence on a 125cc motorcycle.  Also, if you have taken part one (A2 Module 1) before January 19th, but not part 2, your part 1 will not count towards the A2 test - you will have to start again.

    If you have taken part 1 & 2 before January 19th you can ride a bike up to 33.5 bhp and get a full licence after two years without doing another test, but if you are taking the tests after January 19th you will need to take another test in two years time before you can ride a 46.6 bhp motorcycle.

    The minimum age at which the A2 test can be taken after January 19th will be 19 instead of 17 which it has been up until now.


    So the bottom line is that after January 19th no one who is under 21 years old and has not already got their licence, will be able to ride a large motorcycle. 

    If this all sounds totally confusing...have a look at the DSA website for further information. Also Get On have produced some information too which hopefully will help! Follow the links to see what they have to say on the subject.
                                                                                               




    www.wemoto.com

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